Diagnostic imaging

General Radiography procedures, including X-Rays 

Procedures

General Radiography
All X-Ray Procedures

Location

King Edward Memorial Hospital, B block, 374 Bagot Rd, Subiaco 6008

Phone

08 6458 2830

Hours

Monday to Friday 8am - 5pm

Walk-ins Accepted

Yes, for general x-rays only

More information

What is an X-ray? 

An x-ray is a picture taken of the inside of the body by a machine that sends out rays of radiation energy. When these rays pass through skin and muscle they are blocked by the bones, creating shadow effects. These shadows are captured and displayed on a computer screen.

The different parts of the human body have different body tissues and densities, which vary in their absorption of the x-rays. This means bones, soft tissues and other internal features can be seen on the screen in varying shades of grey.

What do I do before the examination? 

Most x-ray examinations do not require any preparation. Articles of clothing may have to be removed if they contain metal or plastic that may show up on the x-ray. You may be asked to change into a gown.

All x-rays require the patient to stay motionless briefly during the x-ray exposure.

The actual examination length ranges from five to fifteen minutes.

How are the pictures taken?

Chest x-ray

A chest x-ray will generally involve taking one or two pictures with the patient usually standing.  

Abdominal x-ray

This generally involves taking one or two pictures, one standing and the other lying down.

X-rays of extremities (forearm, elbow, knee, ankle, etc)

This will require pictures of the relevant area in two or more positions, depending on the indications of the problem.

When do I get the results?

If you are seen in a clinic or are on a ward the images are seen by the referring doctor and a Radiologist. The images are available for viewing on PACS by hospital staff directly after the examination has been performed. If you have been sent here by a doctor working outside of KEMH  the radiologist sends a report back to the doctor.

Fluoroscopy procedures 

Procedures

All Fluoroscopy procedures

Location

King Edward Memorial Hospital, B block, 374 Bagot Rd, Subiaco 6008

Phone

08 6458 2830

Hours

Monday to Friday 8am - 5pm

Walk-ins Accepted

No, bookings by appointment only

More information

What is Fluoroscopy?

Fluoroscopy is a radiographic procedure that uses x-rays to produce a real time diagnostic study. This allows the radiologist to watch the passage of x-ray contrast as it travels through the body. The most commonly performed examinations in our department include micturating cystourethrograms (MCU), Urodynamics, Hystersalpinograms (HSG) and barium studies including enemas and swallows.

The patient will be required to lie on or stand against a table, with a c-shaped camera around them; one end sitting directly above the patient and the other under the table.

What do I do before the test?

Some fluoroscopy examinations do not require any preparation. Preparation is sometimes necessary depending on which examination your doctor has requested.

Oral contrast is sometimes given to the patient at the time of the examination, allowing the radiologist to take pictures as the contrast is swallowed or introduced. Examinations that look at the bowel usually require some preparation. The preparation will be mailed to you with specific instructions attached.

The exact preparation required for your examination will be explained to you at the time of the booking. If you are unsure or need further information, please do not hesitate to contact the department prior to the examination.

Will I need to give consent?

This will depend upon the specific requirements of the Radiologist performing the examination.

How are the pictures taken?

The patient will be asked to lie still on the table as the camera is moved close to the area being examined without actually touching them. When the pictures are being taken the camera may be moved around to follow the contrast media.

The most important thing that patients need to remember when they are having a fluoroscopy procedure is that it is necessary for them to keep very still. Any movement while the images are being taken will cause blurriness, and the pictures will need to be repeated.

Who looks at the pictures?

A Radiologist looks at the pictures and sends a report to your doctor.

What happens after the test?

The radiologist, radiographer or nurse will let you know when you can leave.

After the test your can eat and drink normally, unless your doctor has told you otherwise. Any questions should be directed to the Radiology staff performing the procedure.

When do I get the results?

The radiologist will review the pictures and send a report to your doctor. If there is a serious problem that requires treatment your doctor will be notified before you leave the department.

The results will be available at the next outpatient clinic appointment or with your GP depending on who referred you to the department. In some cases, the requesting doctor will ask you to return immediately after the examination to see them. They will contact the radiologist at the time in order to get a result.

Non Obstetric Ultrasounds

Procedures

All Non Obstetric Ultrasound Procedures

Location

King Edward Memorial Hospital, B block, 374 Bagot Rd, Subiaco 6008

Phone

08 6458 2830

Hours

Monday to Friday 8am - 5pm

Walk-ins Accepted

No, bookings by appointment only

More information 

What is an Ultrasound?

An ultrasound is a test that uses sound waves to show pictures of the inside of the body. It works like an echo and takes pictures by bouncing sound waves off parts inside the body. The pictures made by the sound waves are seen on a TV screen. The entire test is done from outside the body and does not hurt.

What do I do before the test?

The preparation for the test depends on the part of the body being scanned.

Some ultrasounds do not require any special preparation. If pictures of your abdomen are required you will receive instructions to fast for four hours before the test. If pictures of the kidneys or pelvis are required a full bladder is needed and clear fluids should be consumed as requested. Carbonated (fizzy) drinks should not be given.

How are the pictures taken?

The Sonographer or Radiologist will explain the test to you in the ultrasound room. The room is dimly lit and there is an ultrasound machine beside the table. You will need to lie down on the table and be very still. The sonographer or Radiologist will sit down on the other side of the bed and put some warm gel on the part of the body being examined. A transducer (similar to a microphone) is placed in the gel and moved around the area. The sonographer or Radiologist may ask you to hold your breath or move into a different position while the images are being taken. The gel will not hurt and is wiped off after the test.

Who looks at the pictures?

A Radiologist looks at the pictures and sends a report to your doctor.

What happens after the test?

The Sonographer or Radiologist will let you know when you can leave. After the test your can eat and drink normally, unless your doctor has told you otherwise.

When do I get the results?

The radiologist will review the pictures and send a report to your doctor. If there is a serious problem that requires treatment your doctor will be notified before you leave the department.

The results will be available at the next outpatient clinic appointment or with your GP depending on who referred you to the department.

Bone density procedures

Procedures

All bone density procedures

Location

King Edward Memorial Hospital, B block, 374 Bagot Rd, Subiaco 6008

Phone

08 6458 2830

Hours

Monday to Friday 8am - 5pm

Walk-ins Accepted

No, bookings by appointment only

More information 

What is a bone density?

A bone density scan is an x-ray image that is created by using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry or DEXA. This technique can examine the whole body or specific sites such as hip, spine and forearm. DEXA is extremely safe and painless. The radiation dose for hip, spine or forearm is about 10 per cent of a standard chest x-ray. 

A bone density scan is an image taken of the bones of the body by a machine that sends out rays of radiation energy. When these rays pass through skin and muscle they are blocked by the bones, creating shadow effects. These shadows are captured and displayed on a computer screen. The computer then calculates the density of your bones. 

The different parts of your body have different body tissues, which vary in their absorption of the x-rays. This means bones, soft tissues and other internal features can be seen on the screen in varying shades of grey.

What do I do before the test?

Bone density examinations do not require any preparation. Articles of clothing may have to be removed if they contain metal or plastic that may show up on the x–ray. You may be asked to change into a gown. 

Bone density examinations require you to stay still for between 30 seconds and 5 minutes, depending on which particular scans are being performed.

You will be asked to complete a questionnaire before the examination.

How are the pictures taken? 

You will be required to lie on the bone density table and lay still whilst the scans are being acquired. The camera will slowly move above you but will not touch you. 

When do I get the results? 

If you are being seen in a clinic or are on a ward the images are seen by the referring doctor and a Radiologist. If you have been sent here by the doctor the Radiologist sends a report back to the doctor.